Tomáš Trč και Jana Bohmová

Abstract

This was a 13-week, multicentre, randomised, parallel, double-blind study. One hundred men and women volunteers aged ≥40 years with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) were randomised to once daily enzymatic hydrolysed collagen (EHC) 10 g or glucosamine sulphate (GS) 1.5 g for 90 consecutive days. Follow-up took place after two weeks and after one, two and three months. Primary [visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC Index)] and secondary outcomes variables, assessed at weeks two, four, eight and 12, were KOA pain intensity measured by quadruple visual analogue scales in the target knee, the WOMAC total score index, patient’s and investigator’s global assessments of disease activity, joint assessment, use of rescue medication (ibuprofen 400 mg tablets) and assessment of Quality of Life index (SF-36 Questionnaire). Safety and tolerability were also evaluated. Clear improvement was observed in both joint pain and symptoms in patients with KOA treated with EHC (Colatech®) and significant differences were observed. Mean reductions from baseline for EHC 10 g daily and GS 1.5 g, respectively, were KOA pain intensity reduction in the target knee for Colatech® (p < 0.05): WOMAC index decrease ≤ 15 points at the last visit (day 90) for Colatech® in 16 patients (34.04%) (p < 0.05) and for glucosamine in six patients (13.04%); total score index for painful joints: Colatech® 1.6 (p < 0.05) and glucosamine 1.8; total score index for swollen joints: Colatech® 0.5 (p < 0.05) and glucosamine 0.7; patient’s global assessment of efficacy as the sum of improvement good + ideal: 80.8% for Colatech® and 46.6% for glucosamine (p < 0.05). EHC (Colatech®) showed superior improvement over GS in the SF-36 Questionnaire in the Physical Health Index (42.0 for Colatech and 40.0 for glucosamine). The incidence of adverse events was similar in both groups. Both EHC and GS were well tolerated.

Oesser, S. & Seifert, J. Cell Tissue Res (2003)

Abstract

The functional integrity of articular cartilage is dependent on the maintenance of the extracellular matrix (ECM), a process which is controlled by chondrocytes. The regulation of ECM biosynthesis is complex and a variety of substances have been found to influence chondrocyte metabolism. In the present study we have investigated the effect of degraded collagen on the formation of type II collagen by mature bovine chondrocytes in a cell culture model. The culture medium was supplemented with collagen hydrolysate (CH) and biosynthesis of type II collagen by chondrocytes was compared to control cells treated with native type I and type II collagen and a collagen-free protein hydrolysate. The quantification of type II collagen by means of an ELISA technique was confirmed by immunocytochemical detection as well as by the incorporation of 14C-proline in the ECM after a 48 h incubation. Chondrocytes in the control group were maintained in the basal medium for 11 days. The presence of extracellular CH led to a dose-dependent increase in type II collagen secretion. However, native collagens as well as a collagen-free hydrolysate of wheat proteins failed to stimulate the production of type II collagen in chondrocytes. These results clearly indicate a stimulatory effect of degraded collagen on the type II collagen biosynthesis of chondrocytes and suggest a possible feedback mechanism for the regulation of collagen turnover in cartilage tissue.

Koji Iwai, Takanori Hasegawa, Yasuki TaguchiFumiki MorimatsuKenji SatoYasushi NakamuraAkane Higashi, Yasuhiro KidoYukihiro Nakabo, and Kozo Ohtsuki

Department of Food Sciences and Nutritional Health, Kyoto Prefectural University, 1-5 Shimogamo Kyoto 606-8522, Japan, and Research and Development Center, Nippon Meat Packers, 3-3 Midorigahara, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2646, Japan

  1. Agric. Food Chem.,2005,53 (16), pp 6531–6536, DOI: 10.1021/jf050206p, Publication Date (Web): July 6, 2005, Copyright © 2005 American Chemical Society

Abstract

In the present study, we identified several food-derived collagen peptides in human blood after oral ingestion of some gelatin hydrolysates. Healthy human volunteers ingested the gelatin hydrolysates (9.4−23 g) from porcine skin, chicken feet, and cartilage after 12 h of fasting. Negligible amounts of the peptide form of hydroxyproline (Hyp) were observed in human blood before the ingestion. After the oral ingestion, the peptide form of Hyp significantly increased and reached a maximum level (20−60 nmol/mL of plasma) after 1−2 h and then decreased to half of the maximum level at 4 h after the ingestion. Major constituents of food-derived collagen peptides in human serum and plasma were identified as Pro-Hyp. In addition, small but significant amounts of Ala-Hyp, Ala-Hyp-Gly, Pro-Hyp-Gly, Leu-Hyp, Ile-Hyp, and Phe-Hyp were contained.

Steffen OesserMilan Adam, Wilfried Babel, and Jürgen Seifert

Abstract

Several investigations showed a positive influence of orally administered gelatin on degenerative diseases of the musculo-skeletal system. Both the therapeutic mechanism and the absorption dynamics, however, remain unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the time course of gelatin hydrolysate absorption and its subsequent distribution in various tissues in mice (C57/BL). Absorption of 14C labeled gelatin hydrolysate was compared to control mice administered 14C labeled proline following intragastric application. Plasma and tissue radioactivity was measured over 192 h. Additional “gut sac” experiments were conducted to quantify the MW distribution of the absorbed gelatin using SDS-electrophoresis and HPLC. Ninety-five percent of enterally applied gelatin hydrolysate was absorbed within the first 12 h. The distribution of the labeled gelatin in the various tissues was similar to that of labeled proline with the exception of cartilage, where a pronounced and long-lasting accumulation of gelatin hydrolysate was observed. In cartilage, measured radioactivity was more than twice as high following gelatin administration compared to the control group. The absorption of gelatin hydrolysate in its high molecular form, with peptides of 2.5–15kD, was detected following intestinal passage. These results demonstrate intestinal absorption and cartilage tissue accumulation of gelatin hydrolysate and suggest a potential mechanism for previously observed clinical benefits of orally administered gelatin.